Nov 202017
 

Wednesday (11/22)

Kays Hours: 4:30am-6:30pm||Babysitting: CLOSED

4:30pm Step Carol

5:00pm Pre-Turkey Workout Large

 

THANKSGIVING (11/23)

Kays Hours: 6am – 11am || Babysitting: CLOSED

8am Pump Carol

9am Flow Julie

Training

6am Large Group Training (GE Road) JK || 7am  Large Group Training (Kays Drive) Amy

 

BLACK FRIDAY (11/24)

Kays Hours: 6am – 11am || Babysitting: CLOSED

 

Training

7am || 8am Small Groups Allie || 9am  Large Group Training (Kays Drive) Amy

 

Group X

8:00am RPM Regina

9:00am FLOW || 9:00am Zumba

Saturday/Sunday

Kays Hours: 5:30am-4:00pm|| Babysitting: Saturday 9:00am-11:00am

 

Nov 062017
 

 

 

 

Whether you are running your kids 100 different directions or if work is constantly keeping you busy, you may find that it’s hard to eat healthy while in a hurry. Below I’ve listed some tips to help you even in a rush make healthy nutrient rich meals.

    1. Take advantage of crock pot dinners:  These are a great way to make really nutrient dense meals that don’t take up a lot of your time. Just throw everything in before leaving for work in the morning and then it’ll be ready by the time you come home from work, picking up the kids, etc. (www.skinnytaste.com has some great recipes to try).
    2. Leftovers, leftovers, leftovers: You can create an assembly line of sorts with tupperware and put away leftovers from dinner for tomorrow’s lunch in an instant.
    3. Plan ahead: I understand trying to plan ahead can be difficult when you are constantly on the go, but having a weekly meal plan or shopping list can make a huge difference in eating healthy while in a hurry.
    4. Eat out wisely: Know where some healthy options are near your office, home, etc. Find items that you like there, then add those to your weekly shopping list so you can prep those items at home.
Nov 042017
 

 

 

An area of nutrition that interests me the most is nutrition psychology. This field specifically looks at how food and nutrients affect people’s moods. Many individuals don’t realize the large role proper nutrition plays in mental health and overall well-being. 

Most people don’t know that this was actually an issue that I struggled with after losing my weight. I became so obsessive about how many calories I was consuming that my overall nutrition and well-being suffered. This lead to me speaking with a counselor for several months, until I was able to learn how to cope best with this issue. Flash forward to now and this is still an issue I deal with in my daily life. I’ve learned through many of my classes at ISU that to be my best self I need to properly fuel my body.

~Allie 

Nov 022017
 

 

Over the past 20 plus years or so portion size in America has doubled or even as much as tripled, this is a key contributor in the obesity issue we are seeing in children and adults today.  Many individuals have trouble understanding the difference between portion and serving. A serving is the measured amount of food, and a portion is the physical amount of food that is served. Below are some tips and tricks to help keep you on track.

 

  1. Understanding food labels  
  2. Understanding portion size
  3. Serve food on small plates/ bowls
Nov 012017
 

 

Being smart about eating during the holidays is always a challenge, below I’ve listed some helpful tips to help you all make it through.

1.) Don’t skip meals throughout the day in order to “save up” for the bigger meal later in the day (this typically leads to overeating later on).
2.) Pay attention to what you are consuming. Try to fill up more on whole grains, fruits, and veggies because these will keep you fuller longer.
3.) Go for a smaller plate instead of a large one, this is a simple way to avoid overeating.
4.) Fill at least half of your plate with lower calories options (fruits and vegetables)
5.) Get your family to go for a walk after you eat a meal even if it’s a short one.
-Allie

Oct 312017
 

For those of you who do not know me, I’m Allie Ploense and have been working at the Workout Company for almost 5 years now. This semester I’m am doing some nutrition internship hours at the gym. Many of you probably do not know my weight loss story so I would love to share it with you all.

About 6 years ago I was playing at a softball tournament in the Wisconsin Dells, and suddenly the opposing team started making fun of my weight. I was devastated and spent several months feeling sorry for myself, then one day my dad suggested I join him at the Workout Company. Slowly but surely I began coming daily with my dad and using the machines and running on the treadmill. Once I become more consistent with working out I started tracking what I was eating on MyFitnessPal, and began having my mom cook healthier meals. Little by little the weight started coming off, I really did not even notice the change until one day my best friend’s mom pulled me aside and told me how good I was looking and to keep up the great work. After she noticed the change it just sparked something in me to keep going. After several months of hard work I ended up losing 90 pounds on my own, and have been fortunate enough to keep it off for the last 6 years. This major life change lead me to make the decision to major in Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics at ISU.

I would love to help you all reach any weight loss goals you have, which is why I am opening up my services to all of you here at the gym. During the week I have set hours when I will be able to meet with you and they are as follows:

Monday: 6-10am
Tuesday: 10-noon
Wednesday: 8-10am
Thursday: 10-noon
Friday: by appointment
Saturday: 7-9am

If any of those hours don’t work for you please feel free to email me at aploens@ilstu.edu to set up an appointment. I cannot wait to hear from you all.!
~Allie

Oct 272017
 

Individuals are always looking for a quick fix diet this typically leads them to a fad diet. Many of these diets have risk factors associated with using them. A fad diet is any diet that promises unrealistic weight loss or other health advantages that may promote a longer life without any scientific backing.
Like discussed above a typical fad diet plan will promote unrealistic weight loss, for example losing 10 pounds in a week. Other programs may promote unhealthy eating habits that don’t meet nutritional requirements, but not adequately meeting said requirements an individual could suffer physiologically. Typically as a result from programs like this an individual may experience weight loss but really its only water weight and lean muscle mass. It’s hard for anyone individual to maintain a diet that restricts their food choices, therefore individuals typically don’t maintain programs like these and will gain back weight and then some.

~Allie 

Oct 222017
 

Many times individuals want to find that weight loss shortcut, so they turn to skipping meals. This can create quite the roller-coaster ride for your body.

 

Skipping a meal can throw your blood sugar off balance because you are not providing your body with the fuel it needs to function properly, which causes your blood sugar to drop. Low blood sugar can create a shortage of energy. This may cause you to be sluggish, irritable, and cognitive issues such as lack of attention, memory, and basic mental performance. This can physically and mentally affect many areas of your life, like skipping a training session simply because you just don’t have the energy.

 

Skipping meals can also cause your metabolism to slow down. When you have nothing to digest your metabolism nothing to do, so when you finally consume food it is more difficult for your metabolism to begin breaking down the food. The result is food being transformed into fat and gets deposited in all the wrong places.

 

Proper nutrition is vital to your health and well-being and it can help improve or prevent several conditions like cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cancer. Like I always say, “Why skip meals when there’s Chipotle?”

Oct 172017
 

Yesterday we discussed the importance of good nutrition as well as some basic information on macronutrients.  Today we will take a closer look at each macronutrient and discuss some healthy sources of each.

We will start with carbohydrates, this specific nutrient often gives individuals the most trouble because of conflicting information heard on t.v. or read on the web. What’s most important to consider is the type of carbohydrate you are consuming. Some great healthy options to include in your diet could be, sweet potatoes whole grain breads, brown rice, and quinoa.

Your protein sources are just as important as your carbohydrate sources.  Plant based protein sources like beans and nuts contain unsaturated fats and fibers, which help lower your LDL (bad) Cholesterol. Animal based protein sources, which are usually higher in saturated fat, are far less healthy when compared to unsaturated fats. Some great plant based sources of protein are black beans, garbanzos, pintos, split peas, walnuts, almonds, cashews, pistachios, and many others. Some animal based sources are your lean proteins like chicken, pork, turkey, and eggs.

When it comes to fats what matters most is the type of fat you are consuming. Your “good” fats are considered unsaturated (i.e. monounsaturated and polyunsaturated). Foods high in good fats include vegetable oils (such as olive, canola, sunflower, soy, and corn), nuts, seeds, and fish (salmon, mackerel, tuna). Fats you want to limit in your diet are trans and saturated fats. Foods containing trans fats are primarily in processed foods made with trans fat from partially hydrogenated oil. Saturated fats come from sources like, red meat, butter, cheese, and ice cream.

If you have any more questions concerning this topic please email me at aploens@ilstu.edu or set up an appointment to meet with me.

Oct 162017
 

What is good nutrition and why is it important? This is a common question that many people ask themselves. A lot goes into this and I’d like to discuss this with you all. 

Nutrition that qualifies as being “good” would be a well balanced diet that includes adequate amounts of carbohydrates, protein, fats, vitamins, and minerals. This provides your body with the energy it needs to adequately function.

Now the vital part — why good nutrition is important. Like I previously stated if your body isn’t being fueled correctly, it can’t perform many of its basic tasks. If your body can’t function then your health and well-being suffer as a result.

Many diseases like cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, atherosclerosis, obesity, some forms of cancer, Type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, dental caries, gall bladder disease, dementia and nutritional anemia can stem from a nutritional cause.

This is why many recommendations have been put into place. For example it is recommended that 45-65% of your daily calories come from carbohydrates and that half of those consumed should come from a whole grain source, Protein is recommended to be 10-35% of your daily calories (ideally coming from lean protein sources like chicken, turkey, etc.). Finally, it is recommended that 20-35% of your daily calories come from dietary fat (fish, nuts, etc.).

If you have questions concerning this topic feel free to email me at aploens@ilstu.edu or set up an appointment to meet with me.